70 Oph orbit Roche Equipotential Surfaces

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Commission G1 Working Groups

Working Groups (WGs) are created to undertake certain well-defined tasks for limited time periods. They usually have a small number of members. There are currently over 60 IAU Working Groups.

Working Group on Active B Stars

The WG on Active B Stars is currently associated with Commission 42 through Division G. This Working Group has over 130 members and it has been active for over 33 years.

The Working Group on Active B Stars (formerly known as the Working Group on Be Stars) has been in continuous operation since 1979. Its primary goal is to promote and stimulate research and international collaboration in the field of the active early-type (O and B) stars. The original focus was on the classical Be stars, some of which are in interacting binaries, however, their topics now include active phenomena in B-type stars, including mass loss and accretion, pulsations, rotation, magnetic fields, and binarity; as well as the derivation of fundamental parameters for these objects.

The Be Star Newsletter is the official publication for this Working Group.

WG on Maintenance of the Visual Double Star Database

The WG on Maintenance of the Visual Double Star Database is currently associated with Commission 26. See the Working group mission statement. The primary duties of this WG are the maintenance of the Washington Double Star Catalog and the Sixth Catalog of Orbits of Visual Binary Stars.

WG on Catalog of Orbital Elements of Spectroscopic Binary Systems

The WG on Catalog of Orbital Elements of Spectroscopic Binary Systems is currently associated with Commission 26. The primary duties of this WG are the maintenance of the Ninth Catalogue of Spectroscopic Binary Orbits.

WG on Nominal Units for Stellar and Planetary Astronomy

This WG was established in response to an IAU Resolution presented at the 2012 General Assembly in Beijing. The WG, both of Divisions A and G, is discussing the standardization and adoption of nominal astrophysical parameters: radius and luminosity of the Sun, and radii of Jupiter and Earth; and a recommendation for the derived astrophysical parameters: mass and temperature of the Sun, and masses of Jupiter and Earth.